Science proved that reduce weight significantly reduces leaks

A Goodbye to Dieting Could Lead to a Goodbye to Bladder Leaks

Jennifer struggles with her weight and has since she was 12 years old. She suffers from
breathing problems and high blood pressure. She also leaks urine every time she sneezes, laughs or even walks up the stairs. Obesity is the second most common cause of urinary incontinence, and as her weight increases her UI gets harder to control.

Excess weight puts undue stress and pressure on pelvic floor muscles so she lines her underwear with thick pads and must always know the location of the nearest bathroom. There is a solution. People with incontinence who lost between 26 and 29 percent of their body weight noted a significant improvement in their bladder control, according to Healthcentral. The greater the weight loss the more improvement they saw. So why can’t she and others like her just lose some weight?

Jennifer grew up in a family obsessed with weight, and her mother stocked the kitchen with low-fat crackers, diet sodas, fat-free cookies and even low-fat butter. Jennifer rebelled by stuffing herself with junk food any chance she could get. Her weight went up and her concerned parents put her on a diet. Over the years she tried everything – pre-packaged meals, Atkins, South Beach, meal replacement shakes, counting fat grams, and counting calories. Her weight only went up. She began every diet full of hope, but invariably she would stray, feel like a failure, eat even more, and gain weight.

Now she’s in her 40s, heavier than ever and feeling miserable, guilt-ridden, and a disappointment to her parents, husband, and children. She’s not alone. Every year, according to the Boston Medical Center, 45 million Americans go on a diet and
spend $33 billion on weight-loss products. If there are so many options, why are we still getting fatter?

Stop dieting and start eating

In their book Intuitive Eating, Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch provide the tools to do just that. They encourage readers to make peace with food and rediscover the pleasures of eating. Tribole, a registered dietitian, and Resch, a nutrition therapist, offer several principles to help readers normalize their relationship with food. Here are a few examples:

1. Reject the diet mentality

Tribole and Resch encourage readers to reject diets and “get angry at the lies that have led you to feel as if you were a failure every time a new diet stopped working and you gained back all of the weight.” For chronic dieters the idea of not following a diet is scary. But then you have to ask: “Have any of these diets worked for me?” Invariably the answer is no, so why not try something new.

2. Honor your hunger and feel your fullness

Trust your body to tell you when it’s hungry, and then eat something. If you wait too long, you increase the chances of overeating and making bad food choices. Then, once you do begin to eat, pause every once in awhile to check in with your body. Ask yourself does the food still taste good? Am I still hungry? How will I feel if I keep eating? If the answers are no, no, and overly full, it’s time to stop. This can be the hardest thing to do because most of us are programmed to eat everything on our plates, knowing we can’t eat again until the next scheduled meal, which leads to the next principle.

3. Make peace with food

“Give yourself unconditional permission to eat,” say Tribole and Resch. By denying yourself a specific type of food (chocolate or bread) you develop cravings that take on a life of their own and lead to binging. By allowing yourself to eat whatever you want, you take away that fear of deprivation. You end up eating a bite of chocolate rather than the whole candy bar because you know you can always have more.

Mindful exercise

4. Mindful exercise – feel the difference

“Shift your focus to how it feels to move your body, rather than the calorie-burning effect of exercise,” they say. Find what feels good for you, enjoy the movement, and focus on the benefits to your body. Pelvic floor exercises may not burn a lot of calories, but think of the benefits – improving bladder control, increasing sexual sensation, and improving your quality of life. What could be better than moving just because it feels good?

5. Honor your health with gentle nutrition

In his book Food Rules, Michael Pollen says, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” By food he means, “Eat only food that will eventually rot.” Wise words, but does this mean you can never eat potato chips again? No. Just make sure most of your food comes from sources you recognize. It’s all about balance and how the food makes you feel. Sometimes you’ll want a bean burrito with a side of nachos. Other days you’ll crave a spinach salad. It’s all about balance and trusting your body.

Jennifer recently gave away all her diet books. She cooks a variety of foods, emphasizing fruits and vegetables at every meal. She purchased a pair of underwear from Carin, follows the pelvic floor exercises on the accompanying app, and has noticed her posture is better and her leaks are fewer. She knows this way of eating is not a quick fix. It could take years and she may never reach her ideal weight. However, she feels better, eats a lot less, enjoys her food and her life more, and will reach the weight she was meant to be. That may not be a size 2, but it will be what’s right for her.

LifeSense Group’s femtech revolution ‘Carin’ receives $3 million boost

LifeSense Group’s femtech revolution ‘Carin’ receives $3 million boost

Empowering women all over the globe to take control of their own health

September 18th, 2017
Download pdf 

A recent investment of $3 million dollar further increases LifeSense Group’s impact in the market of women’s health technology. This latest sum, received from an established Danish entrepreneur, brings the company’s investment total to $5 million dollar since their idea was born in 2012. “Over the past few months, we have had several investment offers but this investor provides the perfect match for our company.” said Dr. Valer Pop, Founder and CEO of LifeSense Group. “He will support to scale and professionalize LifeSense Group, a key element in the company’s growth phase.” Read More

Sex, libido and menopause – How to reignite the spark

When a friend of mine began dating her husband, nearly 20 years ago, she couldn’t keep her hands off him. “I thought about him at work, while I was with friends, and even while I was grocery shopping,” she says. “Then, when we finally were together, it was all I could do to let him in the front door before I tore his clothes off.” This passion continued throughout the first years of their marriage. Read More

How to find the right underwear fit

We all know a new pair of shoes, a great haircut or a shiny top can make us feel like a million dollars. When you look good you tend to feel good. However, there is one aspect of self-care that tends to be overlooked – wearing the right underwear. In 2005, Oprah Winfrey hosted a “bra intervention,” claiming that 85 percent of women were wearing the wrong size bra.

If it fits and is clean, it’s all good. Right?

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menopause symptoms

The six most common menopause symptoms you need to expect

Last week I woke early in the morning to make breakfast. It’s usually my favorite time of the day, especially when everyone else is still asleep. I can listen to my favorite 80s music on the radio while I whip up pancakes or cinnamon rolls. This particular morning the skies were cloudy and the house was cool and quiet. Then the teakettle whistled and this irrational anger began to flow through me. My thoughts turned dark. Why do they get to sleep in while I have to make everyone breakfast? When is it my time to relax? Then the sweating began. Within 20 seconds I was drenched. I ran outside to cool down. Sitting in the terrace, close to tears, I was unsure where all this was coming from. Read More

1 in 4 women have stress incontinence

Urine loss is normal, right?

Urine loss. It is something we most often associate with our grandparents or even great-grandparents, but not with the woman on the next mat in yoga class.  The truth is however, that your flexible neighbor doing downward dog is likely to be one of the 1 in 4 women who deal with stress incontinence on a daily basis.  If she has given birth to a child her likelihood just went up.  It is a problem many of us share, but few of us talk about. Read More

Re-designing our everyday

As co-founder and creative lead behind Carin, Julia (30) shares her enthusiasm for the potential impact of using design within healthcare and technology. This topic she began exploring during her Social Design MA at Design Academy Eindhoven with her project ‘Just Another Garment’. The concept of protective underwear has translated into Carin. Here is her interesting journey of bringing design and technology together to improve the lives of women. Read More

Harness the Power of the Pelvic Floor

Harnessing the power of the pelvic floor is easier than you expect. Do you ever have one of those “uh oh” moments, when you wish you could just crawl under a rock and hide?  Sometimes an unexpected sneeze can do it, a longer than anticipated car ride, or maybe a hilarious comment you didn’t see coming? You can feel your abdomen clutch as something inside you releases.  Your instinct tells you to run to the nearest bathroom, but it may be just too late. This awkward moment may be courtesy of weakened pelvic floor muscles.  It can happen to the best of us, but especially after having kids.  Another one of those things no one ever tells you! You can change this by strengthening the pelvic floor. Hint: it only takes 10 minutes of training per day. Get inspiration from the exercises we included in this blog post. Read More